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APS Spinsheet Chesapeake Racer Profile – Jay Kehoe

APS Spinsheet Chesapeake Racer Profile – Jay Kehoe

The following is the January APS Chesapeake Racer Profile, a monthly hi-light in Spinsheet Magazine (written by Molly Winans): The speed at which Jay Kehoe answers questions tips you off that he grew up right across the river from New York in Perth Amboy, NJ. At the age of eight, Kehoe started in a Chevron and Shell Oil-sponsored city sailing program on Dyer Dhow 12.5s. His grandfather, the only other sailor in the family, built him a pram, and for ten […]

The following is the January APS Chesapeake Racer Profile, a monthly hi-light in Spinsheet Magazine (written by Molly Winans): The speed at which Jay Kehoe answers questions tips you off that he grew up right across the river from New York in Perth Amboy, NJ. At the age of eight, Kehoe started in a Chevron and Shell Oil-sponsored city sailing program on Dyer Dhow 12.5s. His grandfather, the only other sailor in the family, built him a pram, and for ten years, he competed on Lasers and Blue Jays in junior events and youth championships, as well as gaining tremendous big boat experience, such as sailing with Dennis Connor on Seymour Senet’s Williwaw and doing such races as the Vineyard Race.
After High School, kehoe enlisted in the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG); two of his four years were spent as assistant head sailing coach of the USCG Academy in New London, CT. When he finished his duties, he then worked for North Sails in Milford, CT, before moving to sunnier climes to coach sailing for three years at the St. Petersburg YC in St. Petersburg, FL, where he met his wife Amy Gross.
In his 20 years of professional coaching, Kehoe has created educational programs for Sunfish/Laser and done stints with the sailing teams at Yale University, the U.S Merchant Academy, and Stanford University (seven years). For two and a half years, he has been the waterfront director of Annapolis YC (AYC).
One of Kehoe’s goals at AYC has been “to elevate the junior program and skill levels from competing locally to nationally.” He’s achieved it by bringing I-420’s into the club and getting junior sailors to highly competitive regattas, including a world championship, beyond the Bay. At home, he feels it’s important “to give kidsan experience they don’t get in a normal yachtclub program-not just racers, but all sailors will have the best experience possible.” Bringing boardsailing to AYC and better educating the coaches “to impart their love of the sport” are a couple of ways he’s worked towards his goals.
Last fall, Kehoe won the 2010 U.S. Sailing National Developmental Coach of the Year, an award his wife, Amy, a former SpinSheet staffer and Gunston Day School head coach and waterfront director, had won in 2000.
When the duo is not coaching, they love to take their seven-year-old daughter Merrick out to explore the creeks around Annapolis in theri powerboat Tinsley, “an eBay special,” says Jay. “It looks like the S.S. Minnow.”
Spinsheet: When was the last time you fell overboard?
I’ve never fallen overboard, but I fell off a kayak once.
What’s your best crash story?
I was teaching a class at Stanford, and the electronics went out. I went down below to start the engine, and the student driver hit a buoy in the bay and knocked a hole in the boat. It worked out well, because the insurance paid for a new paint job.
Who are your favorite people to sail with?
Chris Larson, Senet Bischoff, Dave Askew and Kevin McNeill.
Keelboat or Dinghy? Why?
Keelboat, I’m too big for dinghies. Gravity has taken its toll.
What are your favorite all-time movies?
Caddyshack and Animal House
If you took a road trip, what playlist would you listen to?
I set my iPod Genius playlist to James Taylor.
What television shows do you enjoy?
Lawyer shows-Boston Legal was my favorite. Dirty Jobs and Myth-Busters.
If you had a t-shirt with your own one-liner on it, what would it say?
“Bad Air,” on the back! We wanted to do that on the butts of our shorts at Stanford, but it didn’t go over well.
What three items of sailing gear you have that you could not live without?
What is the most common mistake that junior sailors make?
They let their parents rig their boats. Then, they don’t learn how to rig a boat.
What is the most common mistake sailing parents make?
They push their kids into being overly competitive. It’s the parents who live vicariously through their kids who chase them away from the sport. The parents’ job is to facilitate their kids’ learning. When they do it well, their kids sail for the rest of their lives.
With all of your coaching, do you find time to sail?
Yes. I sail on Etchells. I’ve also sailed recently on a J/22, a Farr 40, and a Melges 24.
If money were no object, what kind of boat would you buy?
I’d buy a gunboat so that we could home-school Merrick and cruise the world.
What is your favorite place on the Bay?
I love the creeks, It’s amazing how much water Annapolis is surrounded by. You’re always seeing new things.
APS Staff Review: Seahorse International Sailing Magazine

APS Staff Review: Seahorse International Sailing Magazine

Seahorse Magazine – Our favorite International Magazine makes the perfect gift for sailing enthusiasts.  Warren Richter in Customer Service shares a short review on his favorite sailing literature…  So I love Seahorse magazine, plain and simple. Seahorse is the official magazine of the Royal Ocean Racing Club, or RORC for short. I literally box out my colleagues when the mail comes near the end of the month just to get the first look at the new issue. For a racing sailor, […]

Seahorse Magazine – Our favorite International Magazine makes the perfect gift for sailing enthusiasts.  Warren Richter in Customer Service shares a short review on his favorite sailing literature…
 So I love Seahorse magazine, plain and simple. Seahorse is the official magazine of the Royal Ocean Racing Club, or RORC for short. I literally box out my colleagues when the mail comes near the end of the month just to get the first look at the new issue. For a racing sailor, it is absolutely the best periodical, hands down. It has a complete world view of sailboat racing and will support this with articulate regional (country wide) reporting from regional correspondents. Seahorse is certainly the most technical magazine in regard to the development of sailing hardware, construction, and specifically yacht design. If you want to understand the latest trends in racing yacht design, or the technical side of any hardware or new technology, then this is the magazine for you. If rating rules in use worldwide, or various parts of the world (IRC, ORR, ORCi) interest you, then seahorse will delight you as well. The in depth articles will satisfy any sailors need to know what is happening in the world of yacht racing. Developments and advances from all around the world fill the pages with clear and concise information what is occurring on the cutting edge of yacht development.
This is a great gift for the racing sailor that you don’t know what to give them, as it will keep giving 12 months out of the year.  Also, we’ve arranged a deal for our APS customers to save at least 20% off. The best part is that you can give it and you don’t even have to wrap this gift. Maybe if they are as eager as me, you will be the one getting boxed out at the mailbox next month!
Thanks Warren!
APS Spinsheet Chesapeake Racer Profile – Bob Lippincott

APS Spinsheet Chesapeake Racer Profile – Bob Lippincott

The following is the December APS Chesapeake Racer Profile, a monthly hi-light in Spinsheet Magazine (written by Molly Winans): Newport reminds me of Annapolis,” says Salvé Regina University freshman and Oxford native, Bob Lippincott. “It’s like Annapolis on steroids, all the boats, all the sailing, and seeing the America’s Cup 12-metres during our sailing practice.” Born into a sailing family, Lippincott started on a Penguin with his parents, Richard and Pucky, at the age of five. He sailed solo on […]

The following is the December APS Chesapeake Racer Profile, a monthly hi-light in Spinsheet Magazine (written by Molly Winans):

Newport reminds me of Annapolis,” says Salvé Regina University freshman and Oxford native, Bob Lippincott. “It’s like Annapolis on steroids, all the boats, all the sailing, and seeing the America’s Cup 12-metres during our sailing practice.” Born into a sailing family, Lippincott started on a Penguin with his parents, Richard and Pucky, at the age of five. He sailed solo on an Opti for the first time at age eight, the same year he entered the Tred Avon YC junior sailing program, which was a year early in those days.

For three years, Lippincott was on the Chesapeake Bay Optimist Team and then, on the U.S. Optimist National Team, the goal of which is to provide high-level training to top U.S. Opti sailors who compete internationally. In 2006, at the age of 15, he traveled to Lake Garda, Italy, with Team U.S.A. and finished 196th of 558 in the Optimist class. “It was the experience of a lifetime. I was very pleased with my accomplishment—it was awesome and boosted my confidence.”
Lippincott went to boarding school at Christchurch School in Christchurch, VA, where his sailing success ramped up in 420s and FJs. As a junior, Lippincott and his team sailed their way to a ninth place finish at the national fleet racing championship, the Mallory Cup, and a seventh place finish at the national team racing championship, the Baker Cup. Christchurch was by far the smallest school to earn a berth in both events. “It was really exciting,” he says. In his senior year, his team held the two-time Virginia Interscholastic Sailing Association State Championship title.
In the summer, he sails Club 420s, and of course, Stars, with APS Racer Profile alumna Barbara Vosbury. Lippincott’s grandfather, Robert L., won the Star World Championships in 1950. It’s in the genes. “They are one of my favorite boats to sail,” says the grandson.
Now on the varsity sailing team at his dream school in Newport, RI, Lippincott already sees improvement in his game in Collegiate 420s and FJs. “The big difference between high school and college sailing is that the level of competition is so much harder in college. The starting line is twice as competitive; it requires twice as much skill,” he says. “Rhode Island weather is so much different than in Virginia and Maryland. I was the firston the team to put on a dry suit. It’s freezing! There are no opportunities to just wear a T-shirt and board shorts. You wear gear all the time.”
SpinSheet: Who are your sailing mentors?
Kenneth Andreasen, John Ingalls, Juan Carlos Romero, and my dad and mom.
Who are your best sailing buddies?
Peter Zendt, Laura Beigel, Sara Morgan Watters, Matt Lawler, and Sarah Muzyka.
Do you have a favorite sailing memory from 2010?
My first college regatta at Maine Maritime Academy. I sailed really well. It was a wonderful experience traveling with my new team and reconnecting with old Opti sailing buddies.
What kind of music do you listen to?
Bob Marley, Jimmy Buffett, sometimes college music like rap, but mostly old stuff like 1960s and 70s music.
What television shows do you watch?
I’m an outdoors guy. I’d rather be out bike riding or taking a run than watching TV.
What magazines do you read?
SpinSheet, Speed and Smarts, and Sailing World.
What other sports do you enjoy besides sailing?
Lacrosse, soccer, mountain biking, and ice hockey.
Do you have a morning routine before race day?
I get up an hour early to pack my bag and read over my notebook. I keep a performance log and notes for improvement. I stretch for 15 minutes and drink two bottles of water.
Do you ever go sailing just for fun?
I like to take out friends who don’t know how to sail on an old Hobie cat to enjoy the day.
What’s in your gear bag?
What are your sailing goals?
To become an All-American Collegiate Sailor and sail in the America’s Cup.
If you won the lottery, what kind of boat would you buy?
A Farr 40.
An Exciting Weekend of Racing on the Chesapeake

An Exciting Weekend of Racing on the Chesapeake

  Sunny skies and cool temperatures combined with gusty winds but warm water made the Chesapeake the place for any serious sailor to be this past weekend. Home to the IRC East Coast Championship, J24 East Coast Championship, J105 Chesapeake Championship and Star/Etchells Fall Regatta, 107 boats were spread over the four courses. There were boats everywhere and even a battleship and submarine courtesy of the Naval Academy. Blessed with the conditions and many options for sailing we here at […]

  Sunny skies and cool temperatures combined with gusty winds but warm water made the Chesapeake the place for any serious sailor to be this past weekend. Home to the IRC East Coast Championship, J24 East Coast Championship, J105 Chesapeake Championship and Star/Etchells Fall Regatta, 107 boats were spread over the four courses. There were boats everywhere and even a battleship and submarine courtesy of the Naval Academy. Blessed with the conditions and many options for sailing we here at APS took off our usual attire (APS Polo) and threw on some foulies for a nice weekend of sailing, luckily in separate boats.
On the IRC line, Aaron Freeman from Customer Service and Mike Lindsley from Store Front battled some challenging competition and conditions. Friday was a distance race where depending on which class you were in you went 25 or 45 miles in winds holding steady in the 20s with gusts over 30. Wipeouts and carnage were the words of the day. Saturday and Sunday were a little calmer with buoy racing and winds ranging from 10 – 20 knots. 6 races were completed under what was described as a great race committee. Posting a strong performance throughout the weekend in the end Numbers, Dan Meyers custom black carbon beauty, took the overall win.

Next up were the J24 East Coast Championships. With 35 boats it was the largest of the fleets offering up stiff competition for three great days of racing. Jarrett from our rigging department sailed and found himself helping those with breakdowns in the shop after a long wet day on Friday. Soaking wet from head to toe Jarrett deserved big ups from those who needed his help. In the end it was Tim Healy who won by an impressive 26 points!

One of the strongest one design fleets here on the bay had their J105 Chesapeake Championships. With the largest APS representation, myself (Katie from marketing), Matt from Customer Service, and Bryn from Marketing set off for two great days of sailing. Seeing all the breeze on Friday we sat at our desks hoping the wind wouldn’t blow itself out. But, the wind gods kept their promise and we finished 5 races in varying but generally windy conditions. Congrats to Cedric Lewis and Frederik Salvesen on Mirage for finishing with only 8 points and 4 bullets in 5 races!

Next, was the AYC Star/Etchells Fall Regatta. Also with 5 races sailed, was Warren Richter (shown at left “hiking”) from Customer Service sailing Stars. In the Etchells class, Gary Jobson took the podium with 4 bullets while John
MacCausland topped the Star class.
Crew members with sailor hats on

Finally, rounding out the APS presence on the Bay this weekend was our Director of Marketing, Rob Beach. Rob (second row, second from the left) fellow captains, and first mate Z bone (donning the Dixie cap) masterfully sailed their chartered Orana catamaran alongside Rob”s father-in-law and crew on an Island Packet, to 3 different ports of call during the Annual Dorsey Shady Guy’s BOAT TRIP.

After a great weekend, it’s back to work! We hope everyone enjoyed sailing in our backyard here in Annapolis. Y’all come back soon!
APS Spinsheet Chesapeake Racer Profile - Jason Currie

APS Spinsheet Chesapeake Racer Profile – Jason Currie

 The following is the November APS Chesapeake Racer Profile, a monthly hi-light in Spinsheet Magazine (written by Molly Winans): With 7500 nautical miles separating Annapolis from New Zealand, it”s remarkable how many sailors from that part of the world end up here on the Chesapeake Bay. Sailmaker Jason Currie is among one of them. The native Tauranga-about two hours south of Auckland-began sailing at the age of three with his dad on a 17-foot trailer-sailer. ” I have really good […]

 The following is the November APS Chesapeake Racer Profile, a monthly hi-light in Spinsheet Magazine (written by Molly Winans):

With 7500 nautical miles separating Annapolis from New Zealand, it”s remarkable how many sailors from that part of the world end up here on the Chesapeake Bay. Sailmaker Jason Currie is among one of them. The native Tauranga-about two hours south of Auckland-began sailing at the age of three with his dad on a 17-foot trailer-sailer. ” I have really good memories sailing with my dad,” he says. The two of them raced often and won the Ross 780 National Championship a couple of times. Currie raced Optis and P-class dinghies and eventually Laser 2s and 470s. He launched a 470 Olympic campaign for the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta, GA, before realizing how expensive it would be to follow through.

Currie”s four-year apprenticeship as a sailmaker is what led him to Annapolis through Quantum Sails, still a fledgling company when he arrived in the States in 1997. “I wanted to travel,” he says. “I was young; I jumped on the opportunity.” It was a three-year contract, but then, he met his wife Cameron. Thirteen years, a wedding ,a child, a house purchase, and a few promotions later, the Quantum service loft manager turned sales representative happily calls Annapolis home.

In the past decade, Currie has competed in a wide variety of boats, including the Reichel-Pugh 52, Swan 45, Farr 40, Farr 30, J/24, J/22 and Laser in various sailing venues-Key West, St. Marten, Newport, and Chicago-as well as in major Chesapeake regattas for big boats and Lasers. Annapolis Race Week has been a lucky regatta for Currie, as he was on the winning Farr 40 Ramrod in 2007, the first-place Sport Boat Problem Child in 2008, and the Farr 40 Endorphin in 2010. He”s also been a team member on the RP 52 Vela Veloce this season for victorious Rolex St. Thomas and U.S. IRC National Championship Regattas and second place finishes at the BVI, Heineken and Caribbean 600 Regattas.

When he”s not racing for work and pleasure, Currie cruises with his wife and daughter McKenzie on an Erickson 30. “I enjoyed sailing so much with my dad as a kid, i love passing on that experience to my daughter,” he says. “Traveling as much as I do for work, it makes me really appreciate spending time with my family.”

Spinsheet: Who are your sailing mentors and buddies?

My dad, Scott Nixon, Joe Gibson, Geoff Ewenson, David Flynn, and the entire Vela Veloce crew.

What is your favorite racing venue in the world?

Tauranga, New Zealand, where I grew up. It”s on the east coast, but it has its own harbor, perfect for dinghy sailing, but with an enterance to the Pacific-you”re 30 minutes from perfect sea breeze and ocean conditions.

Do you have a favorite sailing moment from this season?

I went cruising with my family up the Magothy River for an over-nighter by Gibson Island. Everything was perfect-the weather, the sailing, and just seeing my wife and daughter having a great time.

What kind of music do you listen to?

I”m a fan of Crowded House, Split Enz, and most classic rock. I”ll admit I”m a little bit of an 80″s fan as well!

What television shows do you watch?

When you have kids, you barely have time to watch, but I like Dexter, True Blood, and Boardwalk Empire.

What magazines do you read?

SpinSheet, Seahorse, and This Old House Magazine.

Do you have any non-sailing passions?

I like renovating and updating our 1985 house. I put in a new kitchen and bathroom. Once I start a project , I”m the type of person that has to finish it.

What sailing gear do you depend on?

Musto salopettes, a Musto spray top, Musto gloves and Dubarry boots.

If a young racing sailor asked you for advice, what would you say?

Stay in school [laughs]! Go sailing-with and against-really good sailors. That”s how you learn. The learning curve gets much steeper when you”re with skilled sailors. Jump at those opportunities.

What are your sailing goals?

I”d like to win a world championship. In the near future, I”d like to do more offshore sailing and learn more about navigation and onboard electronics.

Ronstan Aquires Andersen Winches

Ronstan Aquires Andersen Winches

What do the Australians have in common with the Danish? Although, that sounds like the beginning of a bad joke the truth is far from a joke. Today we learned that one of our favorite companies, Australian based Ronstan, has acquired one of our favorite winch manufacturers, the Danish based Frederik Andersen Maskinfabrik. Big deal you say? Well, it is. Ronstan has long been a leader in performance sailing hardware but they didn”t have a winch range to complete their […]

What do the Australians have in common with the Danish? Although, that sounds like the beginning of a bad joke the truth is far from a joke. Today we learned that one of our favorite companies, Australian based Ronstan, has acquired one of our favorite winch manufacturers, the Danish based Frederik Andersen Maskinfabrik. Big deal you say? Well, it is. Ronstan has long been a leader in performance sailing hardware but they didn”t have a winch range to complete their offering. With the acquisition of the phenomenal Andersen winch range they do now. We have been selling Ronstan since day 1 of APS and a few years ago added the Anderson winch range to our offering because they are some of the best winches being made. We applaud this move and think it will prove to be a good one for all parties. Stay tuned for more news as the 2010 Annapolis Boat Show (read circus) is in town and we”re sure to be getting more juicy news over the next 7 days. What follows is the official press release from Ronstan…

Ronstan Acquires Andersen Winches

Australian-based sailboat hardware manufacturer Ronstan International has acquired Frederik Andersen Maskinfabrik, the Danish manufacturer best known for the enduring quality and beautiful finish of their signature Andersen Winches.
In the 50 years since the first winch was produced for the Dragon class, the company has built a reputation for excellence and expertise in stainless steel winches. Today’s range of Andersen Winches includes self tailing sheet winches and capstan models in manual, electric and hydraulic versions.
Annette Andersen Lau commented “After three generations of family ownership this is a real change of pace, and Ronstan is taking over a company and a team of employees that is ready for any challenge. Andersen Winches is clearly a great strategic fit with Ronstan and I’m sure it will be a winning combination.”
“Andersen Winches are the perfect complement to Ronstan deck hardware”, says Ronstan’s Managing Director Alistair Murray. “The company’s experience in winch design and manufacture are a natural extension to Ronstan’s expertise in hardware, and we look forward to the broader possibilities that we can offer to our customers with the combined product range.”
In addition to its manufacturing activities in Australia, Ronstan has been producing specialist sailboat hardware in Denmark since its acquisition of Frederiksen Boat Fittings in 2001. Thomas Meyer, currently General Manager of Ronstan Denmark Aps, takes over management responsibility for all Danish operations, with all Ronstan Denmark and Andersen Winches employees continuing in their current roles.
Murray adds, “Ronstan is owned by its management, and we continue to invest in our future at a time when others are standing still or sliding backward. As the economy and the industry pull out of the recent downturn, we are aiming to emerge stronger than ever.”
Ronstan is based in Melbourne and has 180 employees world-wide. In addition to Sydney, Brisbane, and Fremantle it has offices in Rhode Island, California and Florida USA as well as Southampton in the UK, and Vejle, Denmark.
APS Spinsheet Chesapeake Racer Profile – Ashley Love

APS Spinsheet Chesapeake Racer Profile – Ashley Love

The following is the October APS Chesapeake Racer Profile, a monthly hi-light in Spinsheet Magazine (written by Molly Winans): Anyone who heard her sing “The Star Spangled Banner” at the beginning of the Melges 24 World Championships in Annapolis last fall knows who Ashley Love is. The Jersey Shore native and lifelong sailor is no stranger to singing solo in front of crowds, nor is it foreign to her to work quietly behind a video camera. Born into a sailing […]

The following is the October APS Chesapeake Racer Profile, a monthly hi-light in Spinsheet Magazine (written by Molly Winans):
Anyone who heard her sing “The Star Spangled Banner” at the beginning of the Melges 24 World Championships in Annapolis last fall knows who Ashley Love is. The Jersey Shore native and lifelong sailor is no stranger to singing solo in front of crowds, nor is it foreign to her to work quietly behind a video camera. Born into a sailing family, Love started sailing on an E-Scow as a baby and moved onto junior sailing in Optis, Bytes, and Lasers. Although she chose Ultimate Frisbee over sailing as her sport at the University in Richmond, where she was a theater and English major, she was assistant sailing coach at Hobart and William Smith Colleges in Geneva, NY, for an academic year after college starting in 2007.
It was at Hobart that Love started making music videos for the traveling team “just to pump them up. I loved editing and figuring it out,” she says. Those videos helped to land her an internship in July 2008 at T2Productions, an Annapolis-based video production company, where she is now a full-time producer, videographer, and editor. Love’s work has taken her to regattas in Denmark and the British Virgin Islands and all over the United States. “A lot of people go to school to do what I do. I’m sure they know more than I do, but I learn by doing,” she says. “Just like sailing, nothing is ever the same. There’s always a new assignment, a new angle, and a new way to try something.” Love says that her theater background—which included acting, dancing, singing, doing sound work, and directing and writing plays—and a decade of coaching sailing prepared her well for video production work. “I know how to tell a story and entertain. I also know where to be on the race course to get the best shots.”
Among Love’s competitive adventures have been winning a gold for the U.S.A. in Beach Ultimate Frisbee in Brazil and sailing in the Women’s Single-Handed Laser Radial World Championships in Japan, Bytes in Bermuda, 29ers in Finland, Melges 32s in Australia, and 5O5 and Laser racing out of Severn SA in Annapolis.
A year ago, Love and a group of eight sailing buddies started the Young Adult Sailing Team (YAST) for 21- to 35-year-old sailors. “We’re the lost generation of sailors,” she says. Now at 30 members, the YAST team is trying to change that and get more young people on the water to share their passion for sailing and bring back the fun, doing anything from greased watermelon relays to scavenger hunts.
Who are your top sailing mentors and buddies?
My dad, Evan Harrell, and Eric Reitinger.
 
Do you have a favorite sailing moment from this season?
Deciding to buy a 5O5 with my boyfriend, finding one, and promptly buying it. When we were screaming along and trapped out with the chute up in 18 knots of breeze for the first time, it was everything we were
hoping it would be.
Do you have a favorite place on the Bay?
Sailing back to the dock at SSA with the sun setting behind the city.
What kind of music are you listening to lately?
Whatever music I’m editing with. We have a program so you can choose the exact duration for the video you need and the mood and then alter it to your liking. It’s fantastic! I love using the big orchestra and choir pieces for music videos.
 
What television programs do you watch?
Grey’s Anatomy is one of my guilty pleasures. I watch a ton of movies. I’m always watching the cinematographers’ camera angle and style choices. I don’t like going into the movie knowing what it’s about. I love to rewrite the endings.
What are your non-sailing passions?
Anything theater and Ultimate Frisbee.
Do you have any advice for young racing sailors?
The earth is 70-percent water and probably one percent populated, so you have to get out there. Whatever makes you happy, whatever gets your heart pumping, whatever floats your boat, just do it. Let the adrenaline in now, and give risk a chance on and off the water.
Do you have any sailing goals?
I love that sailing is a lifetime sport, and you can’t stop learning. Every time I go out, there’s a new opponent, a new condition. I want to learn how to fix things, too. I just did my first delivery from Annapolis to Cape Cod, MA. I’d like to do more overnight sailing and to see the night sky away from land.
What’s in your gear bag?
Board shorts, 17-year-old Gill dinghy boots, a T2P hat, and Gill sunglasses.
If you won the lottery, what kind of boat would you buy?
I’d want a boat that could take me to those stars. Maybe I’ll find one at the sailboat show!
Fall Racing Preview

Fall Racing Preview

The wind is up in Annapolis and this likely means one thing. We’re approaching the miraculous few weeks where we have consistent breeze. It’s not a coincidence that the best conditions for racing typically hail some of our most exciting regattas and this year is no different. These events include the recently passed Annapolis Race Week, Oxford race, and J/35 NAs, as well as the upcoming IRC Championships, Farr 40 NAs, Beneteau 36.7 NAs and J/105 Chesapeake Bay Championships all […]

The wind is up in Annapolis and this likely means one thing. We’re approaching the miraculous few weeks where we have consistent breeze. It’s not a coincidence that the best conditions for racing typically hail some of our most exciting regattas and this year is no different. These events include the recently passed Annapolis Race Week, Oxford race, and J/35 NAs, as well as the upcoming IRC Championships, Farr 40 NAs, Beneteau 36.7 NAs and J/105 Chesapeake Bay Championships all being held in October.

A very important part of fall racing, albeit of lower profile than the North American Championships that surround it, is the Annapolis Yacht Club fall series. In recent years racers would compete on three consecutive Saturdays or Sundays (depending which fleet you were in) in windward/leeward drop mark races. However this year looks to be different, one may even say the metaphorical leaves are changing colors this year for the layout for this year’s fall series.

The first Saturday of October will introduce a distance race where all boats in all classes (as well as having a Farr 40 and non-spin divisions) will compete in a distance race of 8-40 miles depending on conditions. The following weekend will feature two days of racing for PHRF B, C, J/105, J/30, and J/24s. While the following weekend will be two days for the PHRF A0, A1, A2 as well as the J/35, B 36.7s. My discussions with fellow sailors show a decidedly ambiguous sentiment towards the change.

One benefit is that it adds another dimension to the racing with the addition of a distance race. There now is more fairness given to boats that aren’t as well suited for windward-leeward races and may draw in some boats that may not potentially sign up for the series were it only windward-leeward.

It may potentially encourage more people to come in from out of town to compete. Rather than having to come for three consecutive weekends they will only have to come for two weekends. Additionally the time commitment changes, people now have to dedicate all of one weekend and part of another rather than a part of three weekends, which is good and bad depending who you ask. Good for anyone who likes football that was in the Sunday fleet.

A potential downside is that if bad weather rolls through on one of those weekends, it’s likely to throw a bigger wrench in the mix as adverse weather could potentially ruin two out of three days of your fall series regatta.

As it usually is, one of these weekends coincides with the Annapolis Boat show so for those who attend the boat show won’t miss just one day of the series, you’ll miss two of three days of the series. Fortunately for those sailing in A0, A1, A2, J/35 and B 36.7s fleets, the boat show makes no difference at all, where in previous years you may have been out one of three day of the series; now they won’t miss a single day.

No matter how you feel about the format all that really matters if you ask me is that once you’re on the water the fall series promises to be competitive and enjoyable.

Since this is my first blog post I’ll take a brief minute to introduce myself, my name is Matt Fafoutis and I work in Customer Service. I grew up in NJ and went to college at St. Mary’s College of Maryland. I currently live in Baltimore and have been at APS since June of 2010. I for one, am very excited for fall racing and especially the new format of fall series.