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Single & Double Braid Sailboat Lines Explained | Expert Advice

– Shop Line – Understanding the basic differences in line materials and construction will allow you to choose the best line for your application.  We will cover the differences between single and double braid line as well as their specific materials: Single Braid Line / Hollow Braid Single Braid Core / High Tech Double Braid / Polyester Double Braid / High Tech Single Braids Single braid lines are made up of eight or twelve strands braided into a circular pattern […]

How to Tie a Bowline in the Dark | Expert Advice

How to Tie a Bowline Knot in the Dark on a Sailboat – Three Ways Faster and Safer Ways to Tie a Bowline Knot You probably already know how to tie a bowline, but do you know how to do it fast and reliably, and in the dark? Check out these foolproof ways to tie a bowline in the dark for three different needs on a sailboat.  Once you practice and learn these methods, muscle memory will take over when […]

How to Tie a Cleat Hitch, Three Ways

Tying a line to a cleat should be easy and secure, but walk down any dock and you will be amazed at the creative ways lines are ‘secured’ to cleats.  We will show you the correct and the incorrect ways to secure a line to a horn cleat using a cleat hitch.  You might be surprised what you learn, even if you’re ‘salty.’ Half Wrap Cleat Hitch This is most commonly seen as the standard cleat hitch in North America, […]

How to Measure the Diameter of Braided Line | Expert Advice

Hi, this is Kyle from APS. I’m going to show you how to measure the diameter of braided line properly with high confidence on both used line and brand new line. Line Diameters are Nominal Values Okay, the first thing we need to do is set our expectations around line diameters for braided lines. Line measurements are nominal values. That is to say that the list of diameters are approximations. Things that contribute to the diameter of a line would […]

How to Coil & Stow Braided Lines & Ropes | Expert Advice

Hi, this is Kyle from APS. I’m here to show you how to coil braided line the correct way and the incorrect way. The Incorrect Way to Coil Line I’ve got a piece of 3/8” double braid here. This would be ideal for a halyard. I’m simulating a shackle on the end. Always start with the working end, where the hardware is or where the jacket is stripped. I’m going to do what I think most people typically think is […]

Sailboat Line Materials: What is Nylon Line? | Expert Advice

Nylon line is a commonly used thermoplastic found in many everyday items. It has long been used in the modern marine industry for dock lines and anchor rodes (a fancy anchoring term for ‘line’). When used alone (not blended with another line material), Nylon line serves as a well functioning dock line material. Nylon is naturally semi-elastic, abrasion resistant, and fairly flexible. These traits make it easy to hold onto and tie off your boat. For dock lines, Nylon will give you peace-of-mind […]

Sailboat Line Materials: What is Polypropylene Line? | Expert Advice

Polypropylene Line is a thermoplastic polymer material that has a wide variety of uses.  It is commonly found in many household, textile, and industrial applications. For the marine industry, polypropylene line is tough, flexible, and strong yet lightweight enough to float which makes this ideal for dinghies and small keel boats. Polypropylene Rope Characteristics: Light weight: when compared to  similarly-sized diameter lines. Does not absorb water Floats Excellent shock absorption Easy to splice Economical Low tolerance to UV Low Melting Point Low Abrasion Resistant Some common applications […]

Sailboat Line Materials: What is Vectran Line? | Expert Advice

When you need the Hercules of lines, look no further than a Vectran rope. Vectran is a type of liquid crystal polymer (LCP). It is similar to Dyneema with a few key differences. Vectran rope made its way into the sailing industry due to its very desirable properties of low stretch, or elongation under load. It is comparable to Dyneema but much less creep, and elongation over time. Vectran also offers higher resistance to heat. The trade off comes in that […]