APS - Annapolis Performance Sailing

logo

Tag : how to

How to Wash and Deodorize a Wetsuit | Expert Advice

– SHOP WETSUIT MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES- Key factors in preventing a stinky wetsuit are: Rinse after each use Completely air dry before storing Shampoo & deodorize periodically Wetsuits do not breathe like foul weather gear and technical wicking layers which dry well in the open air. Neoprene contains tiny bubbles that trap the air inside the wetsuit material (neoprene) and insulate the sailor against the elements but is completely non-breathable. This same quality that makes neoprene effective as protective-wear however also traps […]

– SHOP WETSUIT MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES-

Key factors in preventing a stinky wetsuit are:

  1. Rinse after each use
  2. Completely air dry before storing
  3. Shampoo & deodorize periodically

Wetsuits do not breathe like foul weather gear and technical wicking layers which dry well in the open air. Neoprene contains tiny bubbles that trap the air inside the wetsuit material (neoprene) and insulate the sailor against the elements but is completely non-breathable. This same quality that makes neoprene effective as protective-wear however also traps sweat, urine, bacteria and all kinds of things that make keeping your wetsuit odor free a constant challenge.

If your wetsuit stinks to high heaven, the smell is usually because you stored it wet after use. Wetsuits need to be air dried out completely after each use; otherwise, the water trapped inside the neoprene stagnates and becomes stinky. The smell is also the result of a normal sweat and the body oils and odors that are in that sweat. Sailing in a wetsuit produces a lot of sweat, and this gets trapped inside your wetsuit.  All of the above are breeding grounds for the bacteria, which are the cause for that bad smell in your wetsuit.  The other reason for the horrible odor in a wetsuit is often caused by relieving yourself in your wetsuit. Urine leaves an unpleasant smell and is very difficult to get rid of by rinsing alone.

Rinsing

After every use, you should rinse your suit to rid it of contaminants.  To do this properly you need to take the suit off and turn it inside out.  Then completely submerge it in a freshwater tub and agitate it for a few moments.  A hose can be substituted, but you will need to take extra time to be sure all areas inside and out are flushed clean.

Air Drying

Never put a wet wetsuit away.  You are almost guaranteed to end up with an unbelievably stinky suit when you take it out again.  Once a suit has been rinsed, hang it inside out in a well-ventilated area.  Once this side is dry turn it right side in and dry the outside of the suit.  Try not to leave it in the sun, as UV exposure reduces the life of the material.

– SHOP WETSUIT MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES-

Deodorizing

After much use or storing it wet, your wetsuit will begin to sink and you will have to properly deodorize it.  The process is amazingly simple and easy, and the results are surprisingly pleasant.

There are quite a few detergents and other products on the market that claim to get rid of wetsuit stink, but few are very effective.  We recommend a two-step process of shampooing using Wetsuit & Dry Suit Shampoo to clean away dirt and body oils, and then deodorizing using MiraZyme Odor Eliminator which is a product containing natural enzymes and microbes used to remove odors caused by mold, mildew, and bacteria.

To shampoo and deodorize:

  1. Fill two large tubs (15 – 20-gallon size) most of the way up with lukewarm water.  Add the recommended amount of shampoo to the first tub and MiraZyme to the second tub. 
  2. Turn the wetsuit inside out, and using the shampoo tub, start from the ankles (to allow air to escape from the suit) work the suit in and under the water until it is fully submerged.  Agitate the suit with your hands vigorously for 2-3 minutes (be the washing machine).  Now pick the suit up and allow it to completely drain.
  3. Using the tub with the MiraZyme in it, work the suit in and under the water.  Ensure the water is fully flooding the inside of the suit.  Agitate the suit for a minute, ensuring water is flowing in, and out of the suit, and that all air has escaped.  Allow it to soak for 10-15 minutes, while occasionally agitating it to keep floating surfaces wetted out.  After which, remove and drain the suit.  Do not rinse the MiraZyme from the suit.  It will do more of its deodorizing magic while the suit is hanging and air drying.

– SHOP WETSUIT MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES-

How to Repair a Wetsuit | Expert Advice

– SHOP WETSUIT MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES- Accidents happen. Don’t worry, it’s easy to repair a wetsuit tear or rip. Keep your gear performing with these easy steps.  Wetsuits are made of neoprene, which can be mended in three ways. Quick repairs with neoprene contact (seal) cement Permanent repairs with Aquaseal Additional strength with Iron Mend repair fabric A partial tear, cut or rip in a wetsuit can generally be repaired in the field or at home using one or more of these […]

– SHOP WETSUIT MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES-

Accidents happen. Don’t worry, it’s easy to repair a wetsuit tear or rip. Keep your gear performing with these easy steps. 

Wetsuits are made of neoprene, which can be mended in three ways.

  • Quick repairs with neoprene contact (seal) cement
  • Permanent repairs with Aquaseal
  • Additional strength with Iron Mend repair fabric

A partial tear, cut or rip in a wetsuit can generally be repaired in the field or at home using one or more of these techniques.  Contact cement is used in the field for quick repairs.  More permanent repairs using Aquaseal and possibly Iron Mend fabric can be made at home when you will have more time for adhesives to cure and access to other tools.

Wetsuit Repairs Using Neoprene Contact Cement

If you have a small tear or rip, but don’t have 4-24 hours to wait for adhesives to dry, you can usually make the repairs using neoprene contact cement.  Contact cement is formulated specifically for rapid tack and bonding. We recommend Seal Cement by Gear Aid.  It cures to full strength in only 15 to 30 minutes and creates a strong, durable, flexible bond.  Here’s how:

  1. Apply Seal Cement on both edges of the repair area. Allow for drying time of 5 minutes.
  2. Apply a second coat to both edges and let it dry for 10 more minutes.
  3. Press and hold edges together until dry (approximately 5 minutes).
  4. It is best to wait four to six hours to use the suit. But, it can be used right away.

contact cement wetsuit repaircontact cement wetsuit repair

– SHOP WETSUIT MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES-

Permanent Wetsuit Repairs Using Aquaseal

Aquaseal is a urethane repair adhesive and is excellent for permanently repairing small holes, rips, tears, and cuts in wetsuit neoprene.  It will fix just about ANYTHING and if done properly, your wetsuit repair will make your suit even stronger than before.

Aquaseal can be used directly from the tube with a cure time of 12-24 hours or mixed with Cotol for a faster cure time of 2-4 hours.

Here are some of the ways to use it:

Aquaseal wetsuit repair

Apply Aquaseal to wetsuit or neoprene seam

Seams

Aquaseal can be applied directly to failed or failing seams on wetsuits; and neoprene gloves and boots.  Brushing it evenly into and along the seam.  Once it dries you will have a seam that is stronger than it was when new.

 

Aquaseal wetsuit repair

Apply Aquaseal to abraded neoprene

Abraded Knee and Elbow Repair

If an area has started to wear away or is becoming threadbare, create a tough, flexible knee or elbow patch with Aquaseal to protect from abrasion damage. Simply apply a thin coat of Aquaseal with a disposable plastic knife. Dry level overnight.

Rips, Tears, and Cuts

Aquaseal wetsuit repair

Apply Aquaseal to neoprene tear

Aquaseal is the best and permanent way to repair a tear.  To do so, get some removable tape such as painters tape to hold the area together during drying.  Push the two edges of the rip together and tape it in place well on the one side of the suit.  Next flip the suit over carefully.  Paint a thin layer of Aquaseal along both edges of the rip (you may need to bend the suit to pucker the tear open).  Once all edges are coated, push the edges together.  Be sure there are no voids between the two edges, then tape together.  The tear will now be taped together on both sides of the suit.  Make sure it cures flat and untouched

Holes in Wetsuits

Aquaseal is also ideal for repairing holes and tears in wetsuits. For holes larger than a pinhole, create a backing with removable tape. Fill the hole and 1⁄4” beyond with adhesive. Remove tape after Aquaseal has fully cured.

– SHOP WETSUIT MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES-

Additional strength wetsuit repairs with Iron Mend repair fabric

For large wetsuit tears or tears in high wear or stress areas, you may want in addition to using either contact cement or Aquaseal to also add a patch over top for extra strength and abrasion resistance.  Iron Mend is a self-adhesive patch that is heat applied, and specifically designed for wetsuits.  It can be cut into any shape, is highly abrasion resistant and stretches.  All you need a pair of scissors and a clothes iron.

  1. For tears, be sure to repair them up using either the contact cement or Aquaseal method and that they are fully cured before applying Iron Mend.
  2. Pre-heat your clothes iron to acrylic, low or delicate setting. For irregular surfaces, including sleeves and legs, insert a piece of wood to create a firm, flat ironing surface.
  3. Cut Iron Mend to overlap damaged area by 3/4”. Round the corners of your patch as they will be less likely to peel back with use. Place Iron Mend over damaged area with the urethane coated side down and cover with a full sheet of heat shielding paper (included).
  4. Using the preheated iron, press Iron Mend down with firm, even pressure for 10 seconds. Lift and rotate iron; apply for another 10 seconds.
  5. Allow repair to cool for a few minutes before testing adhesion. Apply more heat if needed.

iron mend wetsuit repair iron mend wetsuit repair

iron mend wetsuit repairiron mend wetsuit repair

 

– SHOP WETSUIT MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES-

Images courtesy of Gear Aid

How to Tie a Cleat Hitch, Three Ways

Tying a line to a cleat should be easy and secure, but walk down any dock and you will be amazed at the creative ways lines are ‘secured’ to cleats.  We will show you the correct and the incorrect ways to secure a line to a horn cleat using a cleat hitch.  You might be surprised what you learn, even if you’re ‘salty.’ Half Wrap Cleat Hitch This is most commonly seen as the standard cleat hitch in North America, […]

Tying a line to a cleat should be easy and secure, but walk down any dock and you will be amazed at the creative ways lines are ‘secured’ to cleats.  We will show you the correct and the incorrect ways to secure a line to a horn cleat using a cleat hitch.  You might be surprised what you learn, even if you’re ‘salty.’

Half Wrap Cleat Hitch

This is most commonly seen as the standard cleat hitch in North America, but it is mistaken as being the best all-around cleat hitch which can get you and your boat into trouble.  This is a ‘lunch time’ or ‘fuel dock’ way to cleat a line.  It is not recommended when you will be out of sight of your boat, and not for overnight use.

The line is taken around the two ends of the base of the cleat, but not a third time which would create a complete encirclement of the base (then crossed over the top and hitched on the second cross over). It is an open wrap and can allow even a properly sized line to slip through this cleat hitch until the bitter end pulls out and the line comes off the cleat.  Smaller diameter line (relative to the size of the cleat) or slippery line are more prone to slipping off the cleat and should not use a half warp cleat hitch.  Adding more figure-8s is advocated for more holding by some, but this is not the correct solution.  Use the use a full wrap or multi wrap cleat hitch to add more line holding ability.

It is an open wrap and can allow even a properly sized line to slip through this cleat hitch until the bitter end pulls out and the line comes off the cleat.  Smaller diameter line (relative to the size of the cleat) or slippery line are more prone to slipping off the cleat and should not use a half warp cleat hitch.  Adding more figure-8s is advocated for more holding by some, but this is not the correct solution.  Use the use a full wrap or multi wrap cleat hitch to add more line holding ability.

If you have undersized cleats, you may be forced to use a half warp cleat hitch temporarily, as the cleat may not be big enough to accommodate a full warp cleat hitch.

cleat hitch 1

Full Wrap Cleat Hitch

This is more commonly seen as the standard cleat hitch in Europe.  It is the recommended cleat hitch for all docking, for both temporary and extended periods.  It takes a full wrap around the base of the cleat creating a closed loop before taking your first cross over the top of the cleat.  The line will be stacked on the one end of the cleat (not the other) with two wraps.  These lines under tension create more friction, thus better ‘locking’ the line to the cleat base.

cleat hitch 2

Multi Wrap Cleat Hitch

When a cleat is many times too big for the line diameter being used, you will want to consider using the multi warp cleat hitch.  Think of the base of the cleat as a winch drum.  The more wraps, the more friction, and thus the more holding power of the cleat hitch.  Once you have enough wraps on the cleat base, you will follow with a cross over, and another cross over with a hitch.

cleat hitch

Consider…

Cleat Size and Line Diameter

Selecting line diameters and cleat sizes are dependent on your boats length, displacement, and windage.  If your boat is average displacement and windage for its length, using the boat length alone is sufficient.  Horn cleats are sized to optimize specific line diameters.  Cleat length from tip to tip should be 1″ for every 1/16″ of line diameter, and dock lines should generally be 1/8″ of diameter for every 9 feet of boat length.

For example, if your boat is 36′ in length, it requires 1/2″ dock lines. Using 1/2″ dock lines means that your cleats need to be 8″ long to accommodate and single dock line.  In this example, a 6” cleat would be said to be undersized, and a 10” cleat oversized.  Note that these are general minimums.  As with all docking and mooring equipment, bigger is better.  Having cleats that are oversized allow multiple lines to be tied off on one cleat.  No one complains about having an oversized anchor or oversized fenders in stormy weather.

Dock and Rode Line Type

Stretch and strength is required in your dock and rode line to reduce shock loading your deck hardware and to give your boat a better, jolt free movement.  It is common for these lines to be an afterthought which can lead to damage and discomfort aboard.  It is also tempting, to save money, to use retired halyards, sheets or guys for dock lines, but DON’T.  They are strong enough for the task but are by design low stretch.  Use either three strands, double braided mooring line, or 8-plate mooring line.  These are by design for docking or anchoring, strong, and relatively stretchy.

There are varying opinions on what is the correct cleat hitch to use. “Chapman’s Piloting and Seamanship”, Brion Toss’ “The Complete Rigger’s Apprentice” and the United States Power Squadrons teach the Half Cleat Hitch, while the Royal Yacht Association, Hin’s “Knotting and Splicing”, Peter and J.J. Isler’s “Sailing for Dummies”, and Andrew Sloan Draper & Charles Welsh’s “Drapper’s Self Cuture” teach the Full Half Cleat. Ultimately your experience will lead you to chose the cleat hitch that is correct for your line type, diameter and slip; the cleat length; and the duration of your tie-up.

Measuring and Replacing Sailboat Lifelines | Expert Advice

Lifeline Components How do Lifelines Work Lifelines work as a last resort system to keep a person on board a boat.  In the most extreme instance, imagine someone being washed by a wave from one side of the boat, across the deck and into the lifelines on the other side.  This can generate tremendous loads in the many thousands of pounds; therefore lifeline systems must be able to withstand high dynamic load and translate it directly to the stern and […]

Lifeline Components

Sailboat lifeline illustration

How do Lifelines Work

Lifelines work as a last resort system to keep a person on board a boat.  In the most extreme instance, imagine someone being washed by a wave from one side of the boat, across the deck and into the lifelines on the other side.  This can generate tremendous loads in the many thousands of pounds; therefore lifeline systems must be able to withstand high dynamic load and translate it directly to the stern and bow pulpits.  Lifelines should be taut over their entire length to ensure energy is immediately transferred to the pulpits.  Generally speaking if you take the longest unsupported length of the system (say two stanchions that are the farthest apart) and apply 10 pounds of force at the midpoint (midway between the two stanchions), the wire should deflect no more than 2 inches.  The tighter they are the better, as long as you are not bending your stanchion inboard or making gate eyes too difficult to operate.

In order ensure lifelines are properly tensioned over their entire length, they must be fully adjustable.

 

Lifeline Wire Types

Lifeline wire has traditionally been made of 7 x 7 stainless steel wire with a white vinyl coating.  The internal wire diameters have been 1/8″, 3/16″ and 1/4″ with corresponding outside vinyl diameters of 7/32″, 5/16″ and 3/8″.  Because the vinyl coating traps water, it causes the wire to prematurely corrode, and you cannot see the wire underneath the coating, so visual inspection is not an option.  Most offshore racing rules and regulations prohibit coated lifelines for these reasons.  APS only makes lifelines with uncoated 1 x 19 stainless steel wire which is available in 1/8″, 5/32″, 3/16″ and 1/4″ diameters.

Due to the smaller diameter of uncoated wire, some boat owners will upsize their lifeline wire diameter when replacing coated wire with uncoated wire to make it more comfortable when grabbed by hand.

 

Types of Lifeline Configurations

Illustration of sailboat lifelines with no gates

Lifelines with no Gates – One Section

These are the simplest lifelines.  Since the lifeline runs freely through the stanchions from bow to stern, it only requires one length adjuster.  A turnbuckle at one end (to adjust length) and a simple toggle jaw on the other.  You may substitute the toggle with a gate hook (pelican hook) at the pulpit to allow that area to be opened and the rest of the lifeline slackened for easy boarding and provisioning.  Another alternative is to substitute the toggle with a single gate eye to allow the life line to be lashed to the stern pulpit which allows for occasional opening of the life line by untying the lashings.  Lashings are done using small diameter (around 1/8″) line.  If you lash you lifeline to the pulpit, you will want to reduce the overall length of the overall lifeline length by 4″ (providing 4″ between the gate eye and the bail on the pulpit) to allow for the lashings.

Illustration of Lifelines with End Gates

Lifelines with End Gates – Two Sections

This configuration has two independently adjustable sections.  It is an easy way to create a gate while maintaining the safety provided by somewhat taut lifelines in the rest of the system when the gate hook is detached (unlike a one section lifeline with only a gate hook on the end that attach to the pulpit).  The interlocking gate eye does not allow the turnbuckle to tension the gate part of the lifeline.  Therefore your gate hook (pelican hook), which is adjustable, will be used for fine tuning the gate wire tension.

Illustration of Lifelines with Middle or Center Gates

Lifelines with Mid Gates – Three Sections

Boats designed for gates will have two stanchions approximately two feet apart to specifically accommodate a gate.  This minimizes the open area when the gate is open during boarding, and maintains the safety provided by somewhat taut lifelines in the other sections.  This requires all three sections to have independent length adjustment capabilities.  The turn buckle for the first section, then a gate hook (pelican hook), which is adjustable for the gate section, and an adjuster toggle for the third section.  Both the gate hooks and adjuster toggles have less than 50% of the adjustment range or throw of a turnbuckle, so they are use for short sections of the overall lifelines.  Turnbuckles with their increased adjustment range are used for adjusting the long section of the system.  On larger boats with longer overall lifelines, adjuster toggles may be replaced with turnbuckles.  This allows for a better range of adjustment for properly tensioning longer wire distances at both ends of the system.

 

Measuring Lifelines

What you will need

Preparing Lifelines for Measuring

Lifelines are measured off of the boat, but they must first be properly prepared on the boat, and then removed.  You will do so for both sides, port and starboard, as lifelines are not usually symmetrical.

  1. Ensure your pulpits and stanchions are not bent.  If they are, replace or have them repaired.  You want to make sure you are measuring lifeline lengths for properly configured supports and anchor points.
  2. Equally tension your lifelines over the entire system length on both the port and starboard sides.  Be sure that the load is traveling and transferring to the pulpits (not just against a stanchion).  Generally speaking if you take the longest unsupported length of the system (say two stanchions that are the farthest apart) and apply 10 pounds of force at the midpoint (midway between the two stanchions), the wire should deflect no more than 2 inches.  The tighter they are the better, as long as you are not straining your stanchion inboard or making gate eyes too difficult to operate.
  3. Mark the threaded stud against the fitting housing with tape, a Sharpie marker or measure the exposed threaded length with calipers.  Once you reassemble your lifelines off of the boat this will allow you to set the lifelines back to their proper length.
  4. Remove the lifelines one piece at a time by removing the adjusters and sliding the wire out of the stanchions.  Tag each piece of the lifeline using duct tape  as they are removed.  On the tag write 1) port or starboard 2) upper or lower 3) what piece it is in the system: forward, gate, aft.  Note: Masking tape and tied on tags can get ripped off when coiling and/or uncoiling the wires. 4) if you used calipers, the measurement of the exposed threads.
  5. Put the adjusters back on each piece of the system right after removing them from the stanchions.
  6. Coil each section and remove from the boat for measuring

 

Measuring Instructions

  1. Print out the APS Lifeline Measuring Sheet for the type of lifelines you have.
  2. Set adjusters to their marked or measured length and lock them in place with the set nut and/or pins.
  3. Record the wire diameter for the upper and lower separately on the sheet.
  4. Measure and record your lifeline lengths from bearing surface to bearing surface on the printed measurement worksheet. Please visit How to Measure Wire Rigging to ensure you are measuring from the bearing surface and see some of the methods of doing this.  Also, see how to measure lifeline sections with gate eyes and gate hooks below.
  5. For each section of the lifelines indicate the part number for the end fittings.  To do this, on the measuring sheet take the number next to the fitting in the illustration, and write ir next to the part number you wish to use.

 

Measurements for Lifelines with no Gates

Measurements for Lifelines with no Gates

A: Measured from the bearing surface of the turnbuckle to the bearing surface of the toggle.

Measurements for Lifelines with End Gates

Measurements for Lifelines with End Gates

A: Measure from the bearing surface of the toggle to the bearing surface of the gate eye (where the gate eye would bear against the stanchion).  Note that this requires that the gate hook (pelican hook) is attached to the gate eye while taking the measurement off of the boat.

B: Measure from bearing surface of the gate eye (where the gate eye would bear against the stanchion) – the same point as used in measuring the A section.

 

Measurements for Lifelines with Middle or Center Gates

Measurements for Lifelines with Middle or Center Gates

A: Measure from the bearing surface of the toggle to the bearing surface of the gate eye (where the gate eye would bear against the stanchion).

B: Measure from the bearing surface of the gate eye to the bearing surface of the next gate eye (where the gate eye would bear against the stanchion).  Note that this requires that the gate hook (pelican hook) is attached to the gate eye while taking the measurement off of the boat.

C: Measure from the bearing surface of the gate eye (where the gate eye would bear against the stanchion) to the bearing surface of the toggle.

 

Ordering New Lifelines

By website order:

  1. Add all needed lifeline fittings in your online cart
  2. Add the lengths of  1 x 19 wire you will need, port and starboard, upper and lower.  This is done by simply totaling all of your lengths and entering that one amount
  3. Add the part called I Would Like to be Contacted about Rigging in my Order to your cart.  You many attach a short message to this part.
  4. Check out online.  We will not charge your card nor start your order until we have first talked with you.
  5. Scan and email us your completed measurement for to SAIL@apsltd.com.  Please reference your order number in the email.
  6. We will contact you the next business day to confirm your order and give you a day definite ship date.

By Phone:

  1. Call us to place your order
  2. Be ready to read off the information on your measurement sheet.
  3. We will confirm your order on the phone and give you a day definite ship date.

By Shipping us Your Lifelines:

  1. If you are not comfortable taking your own lifeline measurements, please ship your existing lifeline to us after following the instruction in the ‘Preparing Lifelines for Measuring’ above.
  2. We will contact you to confirm your order and give you a day definite ship date.

* Allow us one week to measure your lifelines

 

If you have questions or are unsure about something; call, email, or live chat us before you place an order for rigging. We’re happy to answer any questions you may have

Photos Courtesy of C.Sherman Johnson Co. Inc.

Fitting Tips for Sailing Shoes & Boots | Expert Advice

  Whether you’re walking around town in your sailing shoes, dinghy sailing with hiking or trapeze boots or sailing in tall offshore boots, footwear that fit correctly are essential for the overall comfort of your feet.  The following tips and techniques are designed to help you get a good fit. Find Your Shoe or Boot Size Don’t forget.  Feet do change size and shape over time, so if you haven’t had your’s measured in awhile, it’s a good idea, especially […]

 

Whether you’re walking around town in your sailing shoes, dinghy sailing with hiking or trapeze boots or sailing in tall offshore boots, footwear that fit correctly are essential for the overall comfort of your feet.  The following tips and techniques are designed to help you get a good fit.

Find Your Shoe or Boot Size

Don’t forget.  Feet do change size and shape over time, so if you haven’t had your’s measured in awhile, it’s a good idea, especially before you order boots or shoes online.

Brannock Device Sailing Footwear Fit Tips

Having both of your feet measured using a Brannock device is the most common way.  If one foot is large than the other (which is quite common), purchase foot wear for the larger.  Be sure to follow step two below when measuring.

Measuring Your Foot Size at Home

If you would like to measure your feet at home, it is easy.  Just follow these simple steps:

  1. Gather two pieces of blank paper, either a pen or pencil, and a ruler.

Measuring Shoes Size for Sailing Step 1

  1. Put on the sock(s) you will be wearing. Depending on the type of sailing, this could be a light to medium weight pair of knit socks.  It could be knit socks with Gore-Tex over socks to keep your feed dry when wearing deck shoes.  If you are sailing in a drysuit you could have on knit sock liners, medium to heavy weight knit insulation socks, the drysuit bootie (rubber or Gore-Tex), and even a Lycra drysuit over sock.  All of these combinations will affect your sailing shoe size.  Keep in mind that your feet will swell through the course of the day, so it’s best to measure your feet at the end of the day.

Measuring Shoes Size for Sailing Step 2

  1. While seated, place your foot flat on a piece of pager. Lean forward, putting more weight onto the foot you are going to trace.  Trace the outline of your foots exactly.  Be sure the line you are drawing is accurate by looking straight down at the edge of your foot as the pen goes round – don’t over or under state the size.  Repeat this for your other foot if you are not sure hat your feet are the same size.

Measuring Shoes Size for Sailing Step 3

  1. Using the ruler, measure the length of your traced foot from the heel to the longest toe point.
  2. Using our sizing chart for Adults and Kids, find your shoe size. If you are between measurements, size up to the next larger size.  It’s easy to add a pair of socks to take up a bit of room, but very difficult to make shoes and boots that are too small comfortable.

NOTE: Not all brands’ sizing is exact.  Just because you are size 9 in one brand of shoe or boot does not necessarily mean you’re going to be a 9 in another.  Footwear shapes and sizes vary from brand to brand; please keep this in mind with using the sizing chart.

Next, check the fit once you get your footwear.

When you receive your shoes or boots, try them on with the socks you intend to wear them with.

  • Remember that your feet will swell through the course of the day, so it’s best to try new footwear on at the end of the day.
  • Check the initial fit. Seat your heels firmly into the heel cups of the shoe/boots, lace/zip them up and stand up. They should feel snug around the ball and instep of your foot, but loose enough that flexing your foot forward is not uncomfortable.
  • Next, move up onto the balls of your feet. Now back on your heels. Do the shoes/boots flex adequately with your feet? Are they comfortable? Don’t be fooled that a shoe/boot can be “broken in.” Sure, a shoe/boot will become “softer” with wear, but a good-fitting shoe/boot doesn’t need to be broken in.  Dinghy boots, either rubber or neoprene, tend not to ‘break in’ and remain similar in fit and flex over their entire lives.
  • You should be able to wiggle your toes inside the toe box (the front of the shoe/boot). To see if you have enough room, slide your foot forward so your toes are just touching the end of the unlaced/unzipped shoe/boot. In this position, you should have a finger’s width (about ½”) between the base of your heel and the shoe/boot. This will allow toes to spread to keep your feet stable and provide room for natural foot swelling; it will also prevent cutting off the circulation which leads to cold feet.
  • Your heel should stay in place. After lacing/zipping there should be no more than ¼” of movement in your heel. This will reduce friction that can lead to blisters and will prevent your foot from sliding forward as you walk on an incline (think slanted deck of a healing boat). If your foot feels like it’s “floating” inside the boot, try a half or whole size down.

NOTE FOR OFFSHORE BOOTS:  This type of boot is slip on, and the fit is not adjustable with laces nor zippers.  There ease of entry and removal is desirable.  If you were to go overboard, offshore boots can be a liability as they fill with water, and easy in-the-water-removal is required.  For this reason, overall fit will be looser than shoes or dinghy boots.  Be sure you simulate trying to remove your boots while in the water.  Sizing offshore boot one size larger than your measured foot size is common if you will be doing blue water sailing.

 

Adult Footwear Sizing Chart

Inches cm Men’s Women’s UK Europe Mexico
8 20.3 2 3.5 1.5
8 1/6 20.7 2.5 4 2
8 1/3 21.2 3 4.5 2.5
8 1/2 21.6 3.5 5 3 35
8 2/3 22 4 5.5 3.5 35.5
8 5/6 22.4 4.5 6 4 36
9 22.9 5 6.5 4.5 37 4
9 1/6 23.3 5.5 7 5 37.5 4.5
9 1/3 23.7 6 7.5 5.5 38 5
9 1/2 24.1 6.5 8 6 39 5.5
9 2/3 24.6 7 8 6.5 40 6
9 5/6 25 7.5 8.5 7 40.5 6.5
10 25.4 8 9 7.5 41 7
10 1/6 25.8 8.5 9.5 8 42 7.5
10 1/3 26.2 9 10 8.5 43 8
10 1/2 26.7 9.5 10.5 9 43.5 8.5
10 2/3 27.1 10 11 9.5 44 9
10 5/6 27.5 10.5 11.5 10 44.5 9.5
11 27.9 11 12 10.5 45 10
11 1/6 28.4 11.5 12.5 11 45.5 10.5
11 1/3 28.8 12 11.5 46 11
11 1/2 29.2 12.5 12 46.5 11.5
11 2/3 29.6 13 12.5 47.5 12
11 5/6 30.1 13.5 13 48 12.5
12 30.5 14 13 48 13
12 1/6 30.9 14.5 14 49 13.5
12 1/3 31.3 15 14.5 50 14
12 1/2 31.7 15.5 15 51 14.5
12 2/3 32.2 16 15.5 52 15

 

Kids’ & Junior’s Footwear Sizing Chart

Inches cm U.S. Kids’ Europe
3 5/6 9.7 2T 17
4 10.2 2.5T 18
4 1/6 10.6 3T 18
4 1/3 11 3.5T 19
4 1/2 11.4 4T 19
4 2/3 11.9 4.5T 20
4 5/6 12.3 5T 20
5 12.7 5.5T 21
5 1/6 13.1 6T 22
5 1/3 13.6 6.5T 22
5 1/2 14 7T 23
5 2/3 14.4 7.5T 23
5 5/6 14.8 8T 24
6 15.2 8.5K 25
6 1/6 15.7 9K 25
6 1/3 16.1 9.5K 26
6 1/2 16.5 10K 27
6 2/3 16.9 10.5K 27
6 5/6 17.4 11K 28
7 17.8 11.5K 29
7 1/6 18.2 12K 30
7 1/3 18.6 12.5K 30
7 1/2 19.1 13K 31
7 2/3 19.5 13.5K 31
7 5/6 19.9 1K 32
8 20.3 1.5K 33
8 1/6 20.7 2K 33
8 1/3 21.2 2.5K 34
8 1/2 21.6 3K 34
8 2/3 22 3.5K 35
8 5/6 22.4 4K 36
9 22.9 4.5K 36
9 1/6 23.3 5K 37
9 1/3 23.7 5.5K 37
9 1/2 24.1 6K 38
9 5/6 25 7K 40

How to Measure Sailboat Turnbuckle Swage Studs | Expert Advice

We are going to show you how to measure imperial (non-metric) turnbuckle swage stud sizes for standing rigging (shrouds, forestays, backstays…) and life line terminations.  The following will be measured and used to specify replacement studs or turnbuckles: Stud diameter Wire diameter Thread Length Thread Count Right or Left hand threads Tools: The only tool you will need is a set of calipers.  Using a ruler to measure is not accurate enough if you want to be 100% sure. Instructions: […]

Threaded turnbuckle swage stud

We are going to show you how to measure imperial (non-metric) turnbuckle swage stud sizes for standing rigging (shrouds, forestays, backstays…) and life line terminations.  The following will be measured and used to specify replacement studs or turnbuckles:

  • Stud diameter
  • Wire diameter
  • Thread Length
  • Thread Count
  • Right or Left hand threads

Calipers

Tools:

The only tool you will need is a set of calipers.  Using a ruler to measure is not accurate enough if you want to be 100% sure.

Instructions:

Turnbuckle threaded stud diameter

  1. Diameter is measured with your calipers running across the rows of threads.Turnbuckle threaded stud thread length
  2. Thread count is the number of threads over a one inch range and will be 20, 24, 28, 32…
    Turnbuckle threaded stud thread hand
  3. Hand is the slant of the threads either to the left or the right when looking at the stud side on.  Right-Hand (RH) studs tighten clockwise, and Left-Hand (LH) studs tighten counter-clockwise.turnbuckle stud thread length
  4. Thread length is the length of the stud that is threaded.  Generally you will find that life line studs are considerably shorter than standing rigging turnbuckle studs.how to measure 1/19 wire with calipers
  5. Wire size is the diameter of the wire and is measured with your calipers.  Be sure to measure the wire at its largest diameter (correct orientation to the surface of the calipers).  See illustrations above.  Wire sizes are generally 3/32”, 1/8”, 5/32”, 3/16”, 1/4”, 9/32”. 5/16”, 3/8”…

 

Now string all of your measurements into a specification using the following example:

Diameter: ½”
Threads: 20
Hand: Right Hand
Thread Length: 3-1/2”
Wire Size: 5/16”

The stud size in this example is expressed as: ½-20 R.H. x  3-1/2” for 5/16” wire

Note: Be sure when ordering replacement threaded studs or turnbuckles that you do not choose life line fittings for standing rigging.  Life line studs and fittings are not appropriate for standing rigging (mast) loads.

FYI: Most U.S. turnbuckles use swage studs that are left handed.  This way the threads are opposite the lay/twist of the wire.

See our full offering of studs and turnbuckles:

Standing rigging turnbuckles
Standing rigging studs
Life line turnbuckles
Life line studs