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Tag : Women’s Sailing

How to Size Dinghy Sailing Boots for Women | Expert Advice

We know shopping for women’s sailing gear can be a pain, but we today we have some tips and tricks to make shopping for dinghy boots a bit easier for you. For women, one especially difficult piece of gear to size is a good pair of Dinghy Boots. The material and styling of dinghy boots plus the difference between men’s and women’s sizing  can make for quite the headache! We can help you with each of these factors. Though in […]

We know shopping for women’s sailing gear can be a pain, but we today we have some tips and tricks to make shopping for dinghy boots a bit easier for you.

For women, one especially difficult piece of gear to size is a good pair of Dinghy Boots. The material and styling of dinghy boots plus the difference between men’s and women’s sizing  can make for quite the headache! We can help you with each of these factors.

APS Dinghy Boots

Though in most other types of shoes you would subtract two sizes from your women’s size to get your men’s size, we typically only recommend going down one size for dinghy boots and a half size if you’re in between whole sizes. Dinghy boots fit a pretty snug naturally, so you’ll probably find yourself in a bigger size than what you were expecting. That’s totally normal!

Keep in mind how you will be using your dinghy boots to choose your size: will you need to fit them over a dry suit and wool socks or, like me, do you only sail when it’s warm and don’t need to wear socks? This is an important factor in deciding which size boots to choose.

Lastly, you’ll want to factor in style to the equation. Do you need waterproof boots or will neoprene work? Do you like a lot of support and sturdiness, or do you prefer flexibility and adjustable straps?

Once you know what kind of boot you are looking for and what, if anything, you’ll be wearing under them, use this chart to help you determine your size!:

Women’s
Size

 US (Euro)
Brands
Ronstan Sperry Gill Zhik
10 (40-41)
9
9
9
9
9 (40)
7
8
9
8
8.5 (39)
8
8
9
8
8 (39)
7
8
7.5/8
8
7.5 (38)
7
7
7.5/8
7
Interview with Jennifer Chamberlin fresh off Olympic Trials feature image

Interview with Jennifer Chamberlin fresh off Olympic Trials

Jen Chamberlin gave us a few minutes to talk about her women’s match racing campaign in the Elliot 6m with with GETsailing. Two years of racing and preparation got them all the way to the US team finals in Weymouth, England. What was your favorite event of the Campaign? The final month of our campaign was a really good run, it consisted of two events and two weeks of training. We started off racing in Hyeres, the World Cup Event […]

Jen Chamberlin gave us a few minutes to talk about her women’s match racing campaign in the Elliot 6m with with GETsailing. Two years of racing and preparation got them all the way to the US team finals in Weymouth, England.

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What was your favorite event of the Campaign?
The final month of our campaign was a really good run, it consisted of two events and two weeks of training. We started off racing in Hyeres, the World Cup Event in France and training in Weymouth and then our Olympic Trials in Weymouth. It was breeze on for the entire month! It was cool to push the limits in the Elliott, this may of  included some swimming, sailing in a hail storm and a few extra days off because it was blowing 50+!! It had been hard to get a lot of big breeze practice and we got our share during this time. Our final month of the campaign we had our goal of where we wanted to be physically and mentally for the US Trials, I believe we meet those goals and put up a solid fight at the end, the results just didn’t quite go our way. 

 

What was the craziest moment during racing you had?

Olympic Trials in Weymouth this May, 2012, Race 1 on Day 2 against Sally… Long story short we spun 4 penalties, we got a 5th but it was offset and still won the race. (To break that down…We spun 4 penalties, a penalty takes about 15 seconds so we spent a minute of that race just doing penalties and were still able to come out ahead).
We got our 1st penalty in the pre-start. We were behind at the top mark and passed on the downwind but got another penalty for rule 17 close to the bottom starboard layline, (We then had 2 penalties, so we had to spin it immediately) we rounded the leeward mark a BL behind. We followed her into the top mark and passed her on her left and were able to gybe across, she got a penalty that offset our penalty.  She was to our left and we gybed for the RC, missing the anchor line by a hair! At this point we got another penalty for gybing too close. We spun it while missing the RC’s anchor line and then were given a double penalty at the finish. We managed to spin them and finish ahead. In these type of scenario’s there is a lot going on with boat handling and driving so it was a really nice team
effort to pull off a race like that! GETsailing

How do you enjoy the transition from college dinghy sailing to match racing
keelboats?

I’ve enjoyed it. There are quite a few similarities from Match Racing to College Sailing. Ex. the length of courses, the type of venues (shifty, mostly flat water and close to land), and you have to be able to race at any moment but also expect long breaks. At St . Mary’s we called this a lot of “hurry up and wait”  in reference to the regatta format. For example, we could be 1st start at 10am for 5 races in the morning, end by 2pm and but be ready to go at 6:30 pm for a crucial race for a spot in the next round could be a normal scenario. The format of college sailing can be very similar, a lot of waiting around but you have to be ready to perform when the time comes.

In terms of the type of boat- transition it has definitely been a learning experience. I really enjoyed the Elliott 6m it has a very thin keel, so learning how to sail the boat down-speed and in chop and waves took a lot of practice.

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What gear would you not leave the dock without?

SUNSCREEN!, Visor, Tech Shirts, wet suit shorts or spandexshorts… I prefer grey lenses Kaenon’s, Atlas gloves, wet suit booties..

If we are sailing somewhere colder it’s a different story… it requires a lot more wet suit layers, thicker boots, warmer hats

 
Where can we find you now?
From the APS Storefront !

I am currently living in Newport, RI for a few months before I moving to San Francisco in the Fall. I am spending most of my time in Newport and my with my family in DC.

What do you like do when you are not sailing?

I enjoy traveling, photography, surfing, biking, cooking.

One thing you wish you would have known before starting the campaign:Gill Rolling Jumbo Bag Black

Invest in good water resistant gear bag, nothing is like leaving for Europe for a month and your bag explodes in the DC Metro 2 hours before your

flight! After “Fixing” that bag don’t continue to use it because my next trip to California at baggage claim it was duck taped together by the Airline..

Don’t ever slack on wearing Sunscreen, protect your skin!! Visit all doctors/dentist before leaving…flying home for an emergency Root Canal a week before your World Championship is no fun!

Santa Maria Cup 2011

We’re smack dab in the middle of it – Match Racing at its finest is in our own backyard! Thirty two of the best female sailors in the world are in Annapolis racing for a win in the Santa Maria Cup hosted by the Eastport Yacht Club. One of four Women’s International Sailing Federation grade events held in the US, The Santa Maria Cup is a world class regatta with some of its competitors planning to represent their nations in […]

We’re smack dab in the middle of it – Match Racing at its finest is in our own backyard! Thirty two of the best female sailors in the world are in Annapolis racing for a win in the Santa Maria Cup hosted by the Eastport Yacht Club. One of four Women’s International Sailing Federation grade events held in the US, The Santa Maria Cup is a world class regatta with some of its competitors planning to represent their nations in the 2012 Olympics.

Match Racing has been popular in Europe for quite some time and is starting to gain momentum here as more centers crop up on North American soil. What’s with the huge upswing?

Match Racing makes sailing more accessible. You don’t actually have to own a boat to get on the water and race. Also, it’s great for weeding out the best of the best – sailors take turns sailing in each of the boats meaning winning a race really comes down to the technical skill and talent of the racers themselves rather than the condition and rigging tweaks of the boat.

This week’s racing should be full of excitement. The ladies will be racing on eight J/22’s. Races take place on the Severn River starting yesterday (Tuesday, Sept. 27) and go through Saturday. We’re wishing good wind for these sailors as they head back out onto the Bay today.

Annapolis Performance Sailing APS Storefront Pros
As many know, APS is only a block away from the Eastport Yacht Club (EYC). Event organizers have been stopping by to pick up spare parts to have on hand, and the racers, too, for replacement gear. Yesterday, one of the US teams comprising of Anna Tunnicliffe, Debbie Capozzi, Molly Vandemoer, and Liz Bower dropped in. We asked each of the ladies about her favorite piece of gear.

Here’s what they had to say:

Anna – Sperry Ventus Shoes and Kaenon Sunglasses. Soft Kores for racing and Burnets for off the water.

Debbie – APS Dry Fit Shirts – a.k.a. APS Microfiber Tech Longsleeve shirts. She has two!

Molly – Atlantis Microburst Vest

Liz – Kaenon Calais Sunglasses

Thanks for taking a minute to talk with us on your break, all! We appreciate your time and hope you get some good racing in this week!